Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference on Gynecology | Obstetrics | Reproductive Health & Medicine | PCOS Zurich, Switzerland.

Day 2 :

Reproductive Medicine 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Muhammad Wasif Rashid Chaudhary photo
Biography:

Muhammad Wasif Rashid Chaudhary has 15 years of experience in Healthcare Executive Management and Leadership in the UAE. His role at Via Medica International Healthcare LLC is as a Medical Director with additional assignment as Director Quality. He has occupied many diverse roles in hierarchy Healthcare management in the past. He is a UAE licensed General Physician and practicing medicine. He has obtained his MBA degree from Delaware University, USA. His passion in Healthcare is to improve existing/current processes and systems by utilizing quality improvement tools which lead to Safe, Timely and high quality, effective care of the patients. He is the Keynote Speaker of many international conferences, including USA and Canada.

Abstract:

Healthcare Champions role is to prevent and control infections in healthcare facilities by using advance strategies and to decrease transmission of infectious diseases from healthcare workers to patients and vice versa is very crucial. We shall discuss evidence based practices to understand why Hand hygiene, Isolation, standard Precautions and correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the patient care are important, to reduce healthcare associated infections and Occupational health hazards. Role of Quality improvement methodologies (FOCUS-PDCA & FMEA) and importance of implementations in healthcare facilities. Our focus will be on post exposure Interventions to infectious disease in
healthcare field and how to prevent and treat employee and also share guidelines for work restrictions to employees suffering from infectious diseases like Meningococcal Meningitis, HAV, HBV, HCV, HIV, MDRO, RSV, Varicella, TB and Influenza. According to Centers for disease control and prevention (CDC), results of a project known as the HAI Prevalence Survey (2014 Data) were published in 2016. The Survey described the burden of HAIs in U.S. hospitals, and reported that, in 2011, there were an estimated 722,000 HAIs in U.S. acute care hospitals. Additionally, about 75,000 patients with HAIs died during their hospitalizations

Reproductive Medicine 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Beth Meyer-Frank photo
Biography:

Beth Meyer-Frank is an OB/GYN Nurse Practitioner. She has over thirty years of experience providing healthcare in a variety of settings including community health and family planning clinics, residential and outpatient treatment centers for addicted women and their children, and a private practice treating women with psychiatric illnesses. She has earned a JD which gave her a better understanding and perspective of issues that affect women. Her organization, “Planning to Flourish” promotes awareness, education, and information about why family planning is of upmost importance for addicted women while they are in recovery.

Abstract:

Addicted women are especially vulnerable to experiencing multiple, repeat unplanned pregnancies. Yet, many women’s health care providers do not realize the specific social issues of these women and their need for long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCS). Common themes of addicted women are violence, incarceration, foster care, trauma and mental illness. Numerous repeat pregnancies that result in the separation of children from their mothers to out of
care placement is common often without reunification. Reaching women when they enter treatment for their substance abuse, and integrating family planning at that time, is critical in preventing repeat, unplanned pregnancies. Access to contraception and motivating women to use contraception is at the core of family planning. LARCS are an ideal method for women in treatment, because it allows them to achieve sobriety and parent their existing children without the added complexity of another pregnancy. Family planning requires insight into one’s current situation and issues in order to make an informed decision regarding future pregnancies. Addicted women that have been using substances lack this insight.
This presentation will address the special family planning needs of addicted women, and the devastating effects of the loss of their children. Author will emphasize why family planning is crucial to breaking the cycle of addiction.

Reproductive Medicine 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raeesa Moolla photo
Biography:

Raeesa Moolla has obtained her PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she is working as a Tenured Lecturer. Her research interests lie in hotspot monitoring and modelling of urban-scale air pollution and its impacts on human health; specifically related to VOC emissions and pollution from the transport sectors. She is also involved in surface and tropospheric ozone research; and is a part of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project (a non-profit
organization). She has over 25 publications and conference proceedings to her name, with an additional five publications being reviewed.

Abstract:

The airport industry is developing at an expeditious rate and plays a significant role in boosting a country’s economy. Although airports create employment opportunities; they are also known as pollution hotspots. Pollutants released from airports (amongst other pollutants); include a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are a highly reactive and toxic; namely the BTEX group (i.e. benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes). Due to the high level of toxicity, an occupational health risk assessment was conducted at an international airport in South Africa to determine ambient BTEX concentrations and the potential health risks of employees. The sampling campaign was conducted during the winter season, as studies have shown a prevalence of BTEX concentrations during this season in South Africa. The campaign adopted the use of Radiello Passive Samplers, with a sample group from ten different departments within the airport. Indoor concentrations of individual BTEX compounds were above international air quality guidelines, indicating an occupational risk. Furthermore, high levels of BTEX concentrations were revealed in specific departments outside the
main airport wing (viz. the paint shop, aircraft main apron, and waste area). In general, the lifetime cancer risk (based on the US EPA standard of 1×10−6) was exceeded for all fulltime airport employees. In addition, the hazard quotient risk was also exceeded in specific departments within the airport. Thus, the research recommends essential modifications within the airport departments be made to reduce future potential occupational health risks for employees.

Reproductive Medicine 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raeesa Moolla photo
Biography:

Raeesa Moolla has obtained her PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she is working as a Tenured Lecturer. Her research interests lie in hotspot monitoring and modelling of urban-scale air pollution and its impacts on human health; specifically related to VOC emissions and pollution from the transport sectors. She is also involved in surface and tropospheric ozone research; and is a part of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project (a non-profit
organization). She has over 25 publications and conference proceedings to her name, with an additional five publications being reviewed.

Abstract:

The airport industry is developing at an expeditious rate and plays a significant role in boosting a country’s economy. Although airports create employment opportunities; they are also known as pollution hotspots. Pollutants released from airports (amongst other pollutants); include a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are a highly reactive and toxic; namely the BTEX group (i.e. benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes). Due to the high level of toxicity, an occupational health risk assessment was conducted at an international airport in South Africa to determine ambient BTEX concentrations and the potential health risks of employees. The sampling campaign was conducted during the winter season, as studies have shown a prevalence of BTEX concentrations during this season in South Africa. The campaign adopted the use of Radiello Passive Samplers, with a sample group from ten different departments within the airport. Indoor concentrations of individual BTEX compounds were above international air quality guidelines, indicating an occupational risk. Furthermore, high levels of BTEX concentrations were revealed in specific departments outside the
main airport wing (viz. the paint shop, aircraft main apron, and waste area). In general, the lifetime cancer risk (based on the US EPA standard of 1×10−6) was exceeded for all fulltime airport employees. In addition, the hazard quotient risk was also exceeded in specific departments within the airport. Thus, the research recommends essential modifications within the airport departments be made to reduce future potential occupational health risks for employees.

Reproductive Medicine 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raeesa Moolla photo
Biography:

Raeesa Moolla has obtained her PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand, where she is working as a Tenured Lecturer. Her research interests lie in hotspot monitoring and modelling of urban-scale air pollution and its impacts on human health; specifically related to VOC emissions and pollution from the transport sectors. She is also involved in surface and tropospheric ozone research; and is a part of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project (a non-profit
organization). She has over 25 publications and conference proceedings to her name, with an additional five publications being reviewed.

Abstract:

The airport industry is developing at an expeditious rate and plays a significant role in boosting a country’s economy. Although airports create employment opportunities; they are also known as pollution hotspots. Pollutants released from airports (amongst other pollutants); include a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are a highly reactive and toxic; namely the BTEX group (i.e. benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes). Due to the high level of toxicity, an occupational health risk assessment was conducted at an international airport in South Africa to determine ambient BTEX concentrations and the potential health risks of employees. The sampling campaign was conducted during the winter season, as studies have shown a prevalence of BTEX concentrations during this season in South Africa. The campaign adopted the use of Radiello Passive Samplers, with a sample group from ten different departments within the airport. Indoor concentrations of individual BTEX compounds were above international air quality guidelines, indicating an occupational risk. Furthermore, high levels of BTEX concentrations were revealed in specific departments outside the
main airport wing (viz. the paint shop, aircraft main apron, and waste area). In general, the lifetime cancer risk (based on the US EPA standard of 1×10−6) was exceeded for all fulltime airport employees. In addition, the hazard quotient risk was also exceeded in specific departments within the airport. Thus, the research recommends essential modifications within the airport departments be made to reduce future potential occupational health risks for employees.